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Posts Tagged "Pastor French"

Blessed in Him

November 05, 2017
By Pastor David French

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Blessed in Him
Matthew 5:1-12

Have you ever noticed how when things in life are out of focus if you will, problems seem to multiply. Today is one of those days that if a pastor and his hearers aren’t careful, things can get out of focus and go off the theological track pretty quick. I say that because it’s not unusual for the true meaning and joy of All Saints Day to be swallowed up and lost in a flurry of good intentions but bad theology.

For instance, with the very best intentions we can find ourselves focusing on our deceased loved ones who have gone to be with the Lord, which means we’re taking our focus off of Jesus. While I’m sure it’s not meant this way and it’s almost always after the funeral, but I often hear “So-and-so has gone to be with grandma and grandpa or their husband or wife missing the source of true comfort. Sadly, we often end up focusing on our own sentimental wonderings instead of on Jesus who comforts us in all of our sorrows.

Consider the words of our Lord from the Beatitudes and you tell me who these Beatitudes are about? Who they focused on? The popular response is to say, “us”! But…should that be our first response? And notice: I didn’t say it was wrong to see the Beatitudes as speaking to us and our reality in Christ. They are about us! But…are we the primary focus? Think about it: By a show of hands who here has fulfilled even one of these Beatitudes as God intended? Look around, do you see any hands … did you expect to?

My friends the Beatitudes are simply not goals for us to strive after in our quest to be a saint. They are not descriptions of what we need to do or attitudes we need to have. That would put the focus of this text on you and me and what we do, and we all know that just isn’t how God’s plan of salvation works. In God’s plan, all the focus is on Jesus and what He’s done for us with His life, by His death, and through His resurrection.

The Beatitudes are first and foremost about Jesus. These blessed realities can only be understood with a Christ centered faith, that is a faith that holds to Christ alone. I mean, who is the One who was truly poor in spirit; that is, who brought nothing to the table except His trust in God above all things? Who is the One who truly mourns over sins; not just the sins that make life rough for us, but all sin; even the sins we’re not sorry for and will do again if we get the chance? Our sin touched Christ so deeply in His heart that He was willing to offer His blood as payment for each and every one of them. Christ’s desire is that no one would suffer for their sin. Can you honestly say that?

Who is it that has unconditional mercy on others, who truly hungers and thirsts for righteousness? Is it you because I know it’s not me. Isn’t it Christ whose being described with these words? Don’t the Scriptures, at the end of Jesus’ temptation in the desert, say He was hungry? And wasn’t this hunger and the thirst He speaks of from the cross endured for you and your eternal salvation?

You see the Beatitudes are first about what Christ has earned with His life and then about the reality of our sainthood, our holiness and our blessedness in Him. And so we get credit for what Jesus did at the time we are united to or graphed into or what we more commonly call baptized into Christ. This is why Jesus says, Blessed are those who are persecuted for My sake.

That is people aren’t attacked by satan, the world and their own flesh for “being good.” Satan isn’t trying to make sure no good deed goes unpunished. That’s man’s idea. God’s children, His holy ones are attacked by satan for one reason … they have a righteousness that is not their own. As we read in 2 Corinthians 5: God made him who had no sin to be sin to be sin for us, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God. This, what’s called, “alien righteousness” possessed by His saints is why God calls His saints “blessed,” and it’s why satan continues to fight the way he does.

But please understand there is a difference between being attacked by satan and being reproved, or corrected by God, even though they may feel the same. Certainly, there times that God uses our suffering or allows crosses into our lives to get our attention but that’s only so that by His grace He might lead you back from your selfish, sinful ways to the way of repentance a way made possible by faith in Him alone.

This fallen, sinful world and its evil prince can’t stand those who truly trust in Christ alone. The truth is: If you’re in Christ, the world will hate you. Satan will target you, and your sinful flesh will try to deceive you relentlessly. My friends it’s not a matter of if. It’s not a probability or a possibility or a maybe. It’s a fact. It’s reality.

Being faithful to God while living in this fallen world will mean crosses and tears and heartaches and sorrows. That’s why God invites and we come to Him in the Divine Service; to hear His Word, to receive His absolution for your sins, to eat and drink Christ’s body and blood for life and forgiveness, and to be strengthened that you might strive to live fearlessly and faithfully in your Baptismal reality.

And that’s the point that needs to be made. It’s only in Christ, by grace through faith that we are able to live out these Beatitudes in our daily lives and vocations, not trying to somehow earn God’s blessings, but simply living the life He’s already blessed us with. That is; blessed us with His grace, His mercy, His peace. Being in Christ we are by grace able to faithfully bear our crosses trusting His forgiveness and standing firm as the world crumbles around us.

In Christ and because of Christ we can be poor in spirit, that is trusting that God is in charge and working all things for our good. In Christ and because of Christ we can dare to call sin “sin” and publicly mourn over it, letting the world know the truth of its sick and deadly condition before its Maker and Redeemer.

We can dare to be meek and lowly, not seeking vengeance or payback or selfish glory or our own ways. We can dare to bite our tongues, turn our cheeks, and quietly suffer persecution, knowing full-well that God is in charge and we are already blessed by Him because we are in Him. We have already been claimed by Him. We and all who by grace trust His promises are His and nothing or no one can snatch this truth away from us.

So, what are we to do? By the faith He gives, trust God’s word both written and incarnate. That’s what all the faithful saints, of all times and in all places, have always done. No matter what’s happening in the world, the saints of Christ flee to His House where He has promised to be to receive from Him a foretaste of the feast to come; a feast that all the faithful who have gone before us are enjoying right now at the heavenly half of the Lord’s Table, a Table we too will one day sit at. A Table full of the splendor and glory of Him who on this day is also serving His love and forgiveness to you, His precious child.

In His Name, Amen.

The False Dilemma

October 22, 2017
By Pastor David French

 

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The False Dilemma
Matthew 22:15-22

You’ve heard me say it before and will no doubt hear me say it again but context is always an important factor to consider as we listen to a text. Now to understand just how bizarre the situation is in today’s Gospel, we need to look at the societal context of Jerusalem. In our lesson we heard that some disciples of the Pharisees and some Herodians came to Jesus. Since most of us have never met any Herodians or Pharisees, we probably don’t realize how strange that is.

One of the many things that you can say about the Pharisees is that they were extremely nationalistic. They believed that Jerusalem should be ruled by Jews, not by gentiles. After all, the law of Moses states, [Deuteronomy 17:15] One from among your brothers you shall set as king over you. You may not put a foreigner over you, who is not your brother.

So, the Pharisees hated the Roman occupation. Now they were also realistic enough to understand that Rome had a lot of power and they weren’t in a position to force them out. On the other hand, if someone presented a reasonable plan to get Rome out of Israel, they would certainly help in any way they could.

The Herodians were just the opposite. As you might guess by their name, they supported Herod. Herod was a puppet king of the Roman Empire. The Romans had put his father in power and they kept him in power after his father died. The Herod family was not Jewish. So, if you were a Herodian, you were a fan of Herod, and, since Herod was a puppet of Rome, you were by association a fan of the Roman occupation.

Normally, the Pharisees and the Herodians were at each other’s throats … if not literally, certainly figuratively. The fact that these two groups worked together to attack Jesus tells you something about how much Jesus was hated. But they had a plan.

The idea was to put Jesus between a rock and a hard place. They asked Jesus a question that was designed to get Him into trouble: Is it lawful to pay taxes to Caesar, or not? If he answered yes, then all those who hated the Roman occupation would turn against Him. If He answered no, then the Herodians would report Him to the Romans to be arrested. If He didn’t answer, then the crowd would label Him as a coward. The Herodians and the Pharisees thought they had Jesus trapped.

Of course, it is not so easy to trap Jesus in His words. Jesus saw the error in their thinking; that is, they were focused on Herod instead of God. So there is a third answer given as Jesus says: Therefore render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s.

The Gospels record many plans to trap Jesus by His enemies and we’re no doubt tempted to believe that Jesus won all these debates because well He was such an excellent debater. We’re tempted to believe that it was His superior skill and divine knowledge that won all these debates.

And while Jesus was the perfect human being and had flawless thought, that was not His main advantage. His main advantage was that He knew the truth and He never wavered from it. Making your case based on truth gives anyone a tremendous advantage over those who depend on lies.

You see the opponents of Jesus in today’s Gospel engaged in a logical fallacy known as a false dilemma. The fallacy is that it falsely offers only two possible alternatives even though a wide range of possibilities exist. His opponents offered two possibilities: either you pay your taxes or you don’t. Jesus simply exposed their faulty reasoning by showing that there actually were other answers.

That is we can pay our taxes, give our offerings, and care for our families. God is gracious enough to give us the resources to do all three and maybe even have a little left over for recreation.

But make no mistake there are still many who face false dilemmas to this day. One that involves our very salvation is the dilemma between self-righteousness and despair. It goes something like this. And please remember this is a fallacy.

We read the Bible; that God gives us a lot to do. So do you do what God says, that is are on the road to heaven, or are you not doing what God says and on the road to hell? This false dilemma is all that many unbelievers have every heard about Christianity. They’ve never been taught there is another way. All they’ve heard is good guys go to heaven and bad guys go to hell. So, are you good enough or not?

This is the false dilemma of the law. I can deny the truth of my sin and insist that I am one of the good guys that go to heaven … but this is self-righteousness and directly contradicts God’s word found for example in John’s first epistle: If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. Or: If we say we have not sinned, we make [God] a liar, and his word is not in us. Or again Jesus saying to the rich you fool when he calls out good teacher, why do you call me good, there is ono one good but God.

To even think: I hope I’m good enough to go to heaven is a thought born of pride and is nothing but sin. Continuing on that path is lying to yourself and calling God a liar.

The other option according to this false dilemma is total honesty about your sin and believing there is simply no hope for you so what’s the point. This is despair. Here too, there is a strange sort of pride … the belief that my sin is more powerful than Christ blood shed on the cross … for me. That my sin is so great that there is nothing even God can do about it. In the case of Judas, his despair was so great that he took justice into his own hands and hung himself.

What peace there is when first we learn that the two choices offered by the law are a false dilemma. Just as Jesus provided a third answer to the Pharisees and Herodians, He provides a third answer for all to the false dilemma of the law.

In Divine Service 1 immediately after we are directed to our baptism into Christ with the invocation and the sign of the cross, we are reminded of our sin and God’s promise from 1 John as we recite: But if we confess our sins, God who is faithful and just will forgive us our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness. You see God gave us a third answer to our dilemma when He sent Son to be our Savior.

Jesus is the one who makes a third answer possible because Jesus actually did what God gave Him to do. He kept God’s law perfectly. Then He went to the cross to take the punishment we deserve for failing to keep God’s law perfectly. He by His life and death provided the only way that avoids both self-righteousness and despair.

And He did that by earning forgiveness for all and freely offering that blood bought forgiveness to all through His Word and Sacraments. You see in Jesus Christ there is another way, that is Jesus is the way, the way of forgiveness and mercy, the way of peace and hope, the way of truth the way that by God’s grace you and I and all God’s children rare brought to life everlasting.

In His Name, Amen

Counting the Cost

October 08, 2017
By Pastor David French

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Counting the Cost
Philippians 3:4b-14

When you read these words of St. Paul in our Epistle lesson about loss and gain we tend to think in economic terms and how we come out in the end. Now our context tells us that’s not the case but still in our own sinful hearts we do the math if you will to work out our salvation. Truth is the word Paul uses for gain is better understood in the sense of winning a race. And when he speaks of loss, he’s using a word that carries with it the idea of suffering violence. Clearly, Paul is not talking about economics but a willingness to suffer things that are hazardous to his health and well-being and that all for the sake of Christ.

But still we do all too often show what has top-billing in our hearts by how we use our money. If a problem arises in life, even within the life of the church, we tend to either throw some money at it or complain about not having enough money to throw at it.

But, like I said, this isn’t a lesson about economics, this is a lesson about you. So, I’ll ask the obvious question: What are you willing to lose? What do you count as loss for the sake of knowing Christ as your Savior?” … See how easy it is for the Word of Gospel that Paul speaks here to be turned, with the holiest of intentions, into Law. That is into something that you must do, something that can only condemn you.

See how quickly these words of loss and gain are translated into synergistic terms; that is – you were no doubt already thinking about what you could or perhaps already have given up for your salvation, as though you’ve done some noble deed for God. My friends always keep in mind the words of Luke 17 So you also, when you have done everything you were told to do, should say, “We are unworthy servants; we have only done our duty.”

Honestly, I cringe when I hear questions like: What are you willing to surrender and suffer for the sake of Jesus? Beside the fact that questions like that are not faithful to this text or the doctrines of grace and justification, in general, still I would caution you to be very careful before you answer such questions because your words and actions will betray your good intentions. We may not like to admit it; we may not even be aware of it, but there is a huge disconnect between what we’d like to believe is our reality and what our reality really is. And when I say reality I mean from God’s perspective.

Certainly, we’d all like to think of ourselves as those who would be willing to suffer the same fate as those modern-day Christian martyrs, who’ve literally been be-headed by instruments of satan for refusing to renounce their faith in Christ. And while none of us wants to be martyred, still we’d all like to believe that we also would kneel down and let our blood be spilt for the name of Christ.

But what I see in our culture is that most aren’t willing to give up a few hours’ sleep for their faith. Not many will chance losing even a Facebook friend over something as “subjective” as their faith or the doctrines of the church. Many are afraid to speak the clear truths of Scripture because well, offending someone is the greater sin. Honestly, more often than not it seems to me what we’re willing to lose is the truth.

The thing is - our text is not about what you should be willing to lose for the sake of Christ. To be sure it is often taught that way turning it into nothing more than a sales pitch to getting people to surrender “all” to up-grade their seat at the heavenly banquet. Many Christians today are brow-beaten and shamed into thinking that they haven’t given up enough to gain the heavenly prize, and the result of that is, satan rejoices!

dear brothers and sisters in Christ: Believe it or not this lesson isn’t about you. It’s not a prescription for better Christian living but a description of what Christ has already given up for you! This is about all that our heavenly Father gave up to gain your salvation! Our God completely forsook or gave up His only-begotten Son to pay for your sin so that life eternal could be freely offered to you and to all. That’s reality! Remember you weren’t just lost—you were a spiritually dead and condemned creature.

Jesus humbled Himself and suffered the greatest loss for your eternal gain. Your sins, even the so called “little ones” that many don’t even think of as sin because “everyone does that,” like say not honoring but taking your father and mother for granted, that one sin alone is so great before God that only the blood of Christ could take it

as we grow in our understanding of ourselves and God’s mercy that the words of St. Paul begin to make sense to our ears. That’s why I love Paul’s statement: … that by any means possible I may attain the resurrection from the dead. You see “… by any means possible is not Paul’s way of saying that he’ll do whatever it takes to get to heaven.

When Paul says: “by any means possible” he actually is making a very profound statement of humble faith and trust in His eternal God and Father. When, whatever this life has to offer is looked at through the lens of the cross he understands how useless it really is, that it’s rubbish, literally dung.

That means that whatever may befall us in this life is truly not worth comparing to what is already ours in Christ. For Paul … by any means possible is another way of saying, “I’m okay with whatever God has in store for me because I know that God is working all things for the good of His church. And if that means that Paul has to suffer before God brings him home, then so be it.

That’s what “trust in God above all things” looks and sounds like in real life. It’s absolutely beautiful, and it’s not something that can be commanded or coerced or taught. This “sanctified trust” is a blessed fruit of faith in Christ alone.

Here is Christ Jesus…for you! Here is the One who lost everything for you that you by grace thorough faith might gain everything from Him. The Gospel reality of “Christ crucified for you” is the life-giving seed we sow, the seed that by Gods’ grace and nurturing takes root in your heart and springs up to bear the fruit of faith.

A faith so real that even when you doubt in your sinful mind God’s gift of faith in our heart firmly trust in Him in good times and in bad times, for better or worse, in sickness and in health, for richer or poorer, until finally death separates us from this veil of tears and face to face we are reunited with our eternal groom in His heavenly Kingdom.

But until that day forgetting what is behind we press forward in faith. Will we ever run this race of life in the faith perfectly? No, we can all honestly own the words of our lesson: Not that I’ve already obtained this or am already perfect … but that’s not the point, as you know Christ has already paid for all sins. We run not counting the cost because with Paul Christ Jesus has made us His own.

In His Holy Name, Amen.

Scorching Heat?

September 24, 2017
By Pastor David French

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Scorching Heat?
Matthew 20:1-16

There’ve been many changes in our society over the years. One thing that has not changed, however, is "waiting in line" or "taking your turn." It is amazing how complicated the rules for waiting in line are. Yet everyone seems to know them. You can't cut in line, but you can save a place for someone in line under the right circumstances. It is amazing that people will quietly wait in line, but if someone breaks the protocol, cries of "Hey! Wait your turn!" erupt from those who have put in their time.

It’s this deep mindset in our culture that makes the words of Jesus in today's Gospel so bizarre. He told a story and then said: So the last will be first, and the first last …, which goes against pretty much everything that our society thinks of as fair.

Today's Gospel relates the story that Jesus told we know as the "Laborers in the Vineyard." The main point of this story is fairly straight forward. The work day represents a life time. We see that some people are born into faithful families who bring them to the Lord while they are still infants.

These people never know a time when Jesus is not a part of their lives. At the other end of the spectrum are people who make death bed confessions - people like the thief on the cross. The Holy Spirit brings these people into the faith just days or even moments before death.

As the master hires people at various times of the day, we are meant to think of the different points in life when the Holy Spirit brings people to faith. The point is - as long as it is day – that is, as long as a person is alive – it’s not too late for the Holy Spirit to bring him or her into God's family.

We also need to remember that first and last are not always related to time or standing in line. In the Scriptures the words: "First and Last" can also have a broader meaning. The verses right before today's Gospel reading are about the rich, young ruler who came to Jesus and wanted to know what he must do to be saved. Jesus first points to the second table of the commandments those forbidding murder, adultery, theft, and so forth. The young man claimed to have kept them all.

Then Jesus went back to the first table of the law and we discover that this young man loved his possessions more than he loved God. The next words Jesus speaks are about the camel and the eye of the needle ending with the words: Again I tell you, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich person to enter the kingdom of God.". And His disciples respond: … Who then can be saved?

You see at that time people thought they were first in God’s sight because of their wealth alone and other people were last or least in God’s sight because of their poverty alone. And we’re no different.

Our culture has many ways of judging people to be a part of the upper crust: wealth, fame, talent, beauty, and while none of these things are bad they certainly aren’t an indication of how much God loves us either. Jesus wants us to remember that many who we judge to be the “least” in our culture may in fact be the first to enter the kingdom of heaven.

And then there’s the, maybe too familiar, attitude of those hired first. Listen to their concern again. 'These last worked only one hour, and you have made them equal to us who have borne the burden of the day and the scorching heat.'

Now before we consider their complaint, let’s think in general about the experience of life time Christians. They are baptized into God's family as infants. They were brought to church on a weekly basis to receive the forgiveness that Jesus Christ earned on the cross for all. As they grew up, they were taught the basics of the faith. After they demonstrated the ability to examine themselves, they received the gift of Christ's body and blood on a regular basis.

When they encountered difficult times, God's reminds them that He is always with them. The Holy Spirit worked throughout their lives to keep them in the faith so that when their last hour came, they left this valley of the shadow of death and joined our Lord in heaven.

The life time Christian knows that Jesus is always with them. They simply can't see Him while they live in this sin-filled world. Since Jesus is here, the reign of heaven has already begun.

The life time Christian knows that he or she is not trying to earn a place in heaven but simply waiting for the day when God will reveal what we already processes. The life time Christian has from the moment of their baptism possessed forgiveness and life and all the other blessings that come from the cross until we are home with Christ in heaven.

Given all these blessings, why do you think the life-long Christian in our text describe his life as a burden or as scorching heat? Stings a little bit doesn’t it? You see it’s so easy, so natural for us to feel as though we’re doing some great thing for God when by His gracious invitation we become a Christian. It’s so who we are to think that heaven is some sort of reward for those who bear a cross for Jesus.

The person who makes the death bed confession receives the same heaven that a life time Christian receives. On the other hand, this person who received the last-minute reprieve did not experience a life time of forgiveness from Jesus while on earth. They didn’t know the peace that comes from God alone. They never knew what it’s like to always have someone who listens.

Every now and then someone will ask the obvious question. "If God will give me all of heaven whether I become a Christian today or twenty years from now, why not wait? Why not have a little fun, enjoy life and then become a Christian?

And that can work if you see tomorrow but still that’s a person who at that moment has been convinced by satan the world and their own flesh that the life of the Christian is a burden. I mean so many rules: honor your parents, don’t kill or steal from each other not to mention the expectation that you go to church. Who would have time to enjoy life if all you’re doing is being “good” for God.

They of course don’t understand that Jesus carried the burden of being good for God to the cross for each of us a long time ago. They don’t understand the Christian life is a gift from the Holy Spirit. They don’t understand what they’re missing and only the Holy Spirit can explain or open their eyes and minds to … not just know about Jesus but to live their life in Him. They don’t understand … but they can!

this very day God continues to search the market place that is the world looking for workers for His vineyard. Truth is it really doesn’t matter when we receive faith only that we do. You see whether our faith is old or young, we rejoice because no matter when … we all received faith as a gift, a gift that brings with it, life everlasting through the blood Christ shed for you and for all.

In His Name, Amen

 

What About Your Guardian Angel?

September 10, 2017
By Pastor David French

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What About Your Guardian Angel?
Matthew 18:1-10

Depending on who you ask or what TV shows you watch there are many different ways to tell if a person is lying. One of the most commonly held beliefs is that a person won’t or can’t look you in the eye when they’re lying to you. They’ll look up, down, off to the side, but they won’t look you in the eye. But the truth is there are those who can and do look us straight in the eye and lie to us.

In our Gospel lesson for this morning, we get a glimpse of this heavenly eye-to-eye reality with God’s holy angels; the same angels who God Himself sends to watch over and protect us in our day-to-day lives. As Jesus said: For I tell you, that in heaven the angels of these little ones always see the face of My Father who is in heaven. Now, it’s important to notice and keep in mind that Jesus is speaking to His disciples. He’s not speaking to the Pharisees or some crowd of unbelievers but He is as it were, speaking to His Church.

The disciples of Jesus, as well-intentioned and faithful as they were, had some serious flaws. I mean here they are, this time and the Greek makes clear were arguing about who among them would be the greatest in heaven. But in their defense, you can sort of understand, I mean the last two years have been nothing but Jesus putting the Pharisees and Sadducees in their place, doing miracle after miracle, healing the sick, raising the dead, feeding the poor, huge crowds gathered wherever Jesus went. And remember the last words of John’s gospel: Jesus did many other things as well. If every one of them were written down, I suppose that even the whole world would not have room for the books that would be written.

You see up until really the time of Peter’s confession about ten days ago when Jesus started talking about His death they had been on one amazing journey. But they were also starting to get a little bit full of themselves if you will. Envisioning Jesus kingdom the way they did and all they began elbowing and posturing to be the “greatest”.

Jesus was well aware that His ministry was about to take a change His disciples just don’t anticipate which is why Jesus sets, a baby in their midst, and says: Unless you repent and become like these little ones in your faith, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. Whoever humbles himself like this little child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven.”

Now, some people hear this and start talking about the innocence of a child being what Jesus is urging us to strive for here. But that’s wrong, plain and simple. Babies are by nature completely self-centered. They don’t care that mom hasn’t slept 2 hours in a row in days.

They don’t care that dad has to get up early in the morning. For the infant, it’s all about me! This doesn’t even consider the fact that babies get sick and sometimes sadly they die. Truly, the wages of sin is death.

My friends if babies were innocent there would be no miscarriages or stillbirths, no tiny coffins. Do you really think babies don’t need of a Savior? I mean, didn’t Christ die so that all who have faith in Him will not perish but have everlasting life? Isn’t the gift of faith created in all who are baptized?

So, are babies innocent … no. But do Christian babies have a more trusting faith than any thinking reasoning person? Absolutely! This is the reality that Jesus is speaking to with His proud and arrogant disciples. The littlest of children have nothing to bring to the table in terms of salvation. They don’t have any works or words or deeds to put their trust in.

We on the other hand actually feel good about ourselves when in our inner thoughts we consider: … all the good things we’ve done. The baby has nothing but the faith God created within them and that faith holds to nothing but the gospel promise of forgiveness worked in their hearts.

One problem we have is we forget faith is not an act of the mind but a living and active gift of God. As Paul writes to the Thessalonians your faith is growing more and more (2 Thess 1:3) Another problem we have is the influence of the world also grows more and more.

That’s the point Jesus is making when He speaks to His disciples about how the guardian angels of these children see the face of my Father who is in heaven. These children are indeed sinful, no different than any of us, but they are living their faith in a God pleasing way and we adults are not. The guardian angels of the little-ones have nothing to be ashamed of before God. They don’t have to avert their eyes when they come to God about the one under their care.

So, what about your guardian angel? Jesus is implying that the guardian angels of those “great” disciples do not see God’s face. That is, they avert their eyes in shame when they’re in the presence of the heavenly Father. I can only imagine how my guardian angel must feel every time he goes before God. “Lord, it’s it seems as though Your Will is being done in-spite of him rather than through him.” And if you don’t confess this same thing about your life, then you’re in the same boat as the disciples in our lesson who were blinded by their own perceived glory.

Seriously, if you can’t look at your life in the light of the Ten commandments and see that you and every Christian who thinks for him or herself makes our guardian angels ashamed to stand before God and report on how we’ve handled this gift we call life then you’re not being honest with yourself or with God who already knows and wants only to forgive you. You can’t seriously believe that your Lord is proud of every thought word or deed that has come from or is hidden within you?

But before you hang your heads in despair, lamenting the fact that by these standards no one can be saved, remember that Jesus Christ live in your place and gave up His life to pay for your sin. Repent and believe that you may by grace live your faith confidently looking forward to the time you look your Lord in the eye confessing to Him that you are sinful and unclean and deserve nothing but His present and eternal punishment.

You know you’re not really just a victim of circumstance. It’s not your parents, spouse, children or works fault and the devil didn’t make you do it. Be honest. You have sinned because you are a sinner, sinful from birth and by nature an enemy of God.

The solution, the only solution is to repent. Open the eyes of faith God gave you and behold the glory of His unconditional and amazing grace. Hear and taste the real and tangible forgiveness and love He feeds you this very day in the form of His Word and His very body and blood. He is the One who takes away the sin of the world! Because Christ died for all. This is the gospel truth we live with, rejoice and be glad for Christ has washed you clean with His blood and made you His own.

In Jesus's name, Amen

Prophet, Priest, and King

August 27, 2017
By Pastor David French

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Prophet, Priest, and King
Matthew 16:13-20

Last week’s Gospel had the disciples in the area around Tyre and Sidon located on the shore of the Mediterranean in Gentile territory. Jesus had taken the disciples North of Galilee around Caesarea Philippi to get away from the badgering of the scribes and Pharisees in Jerusalem.

Jesus used this time away from the crowds of Galilee to teach His disciples. Today’s lesson really continues the theme of the last two weeks which has been about the true identity of Jesus. Jesus began the conversation by asking the disciples about the opinion of the crowds. [Jesus] asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, others say Elijah, and others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.”

It is sort of interesting that all of their guesses are dead prophets. Herod had recently killed John the Baptist. Elijah was taken up in a whirl-wind about a thousand years earlier. Jeremiah had disappeared somewhere in Egypt after the Babylonians destroyed Jerusalem over a half century earlier. The people in our lesson thought that Jesus was one of these dead prophets come back to life.

I wonder what people would say if you took a poll at a busy shopping center and asked who is Jesus? I would guess that some would say a rebel, others a great teacher or maybe a life coach. Still others think of Jesus as some permissive personality who pretty much lets you do whatever you want as long as you don’t hurt anyone else.

There were many opinions back then and there are many opinions today. The problem with opinions is that opinions based on guesswork are usually wrong. Opinions about who Jesus is are no exception. People who simply guess about Jesus’ identity based on what they may or may not know will get it wrong.

The truth however is when you get the identity of Jesus wrong, you get salvation wrong. You can talk like a Christian all day long and maybe even fool a lot of people into believing you’re a Christian, but, in the end, you will enter into eternal punishment. As the last two weeks have pointed out, to understand salvation you must know who Jesus is.

And there is only one right answer to that question and we heard that answer from Peter of all people. [Jesus] said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” Simon Peter replied, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father who is in heaven. This is the only right answer both then and now.

But what does it mean that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of the living God? Jesus knew that the disciples wouldn’t understand the answer to that question until after He had suffered, died, and rose from the dead. That’s why Jesus strictly charged the disciples to tell no one who He was. He knew the disciples didn’t understand and He didn’t want them to give others the same wrong understanding of what it means to be the Christ.

The title Christ comes from the Greek word that means to anoint. The Hebrew equivalent is Messiah. So we can say the Christ, or the Messiah or we can say the Anointed One. They all mean the same thing and refer to the same person.

Now anointing you may recall was a rite for setting someone aside for a special office. In the Old Testament, Aaron was anointed priest, David was anointed king, and Elijah anointed Elisha to be the prophet after him. The anointed offices of the Old Testament are prophet, priest, and king. As the Anointed One, Jesus fulfilled all of those offices just like Moses said.

Jesus is the prophet anointed by God. Now it’s easy to see Jesus as prophet when we understand what a prophet is and who Jesus is. A prophet is someone who speaks for God. Jesus is both man and God. Who better to speak for God than God Himself which makes Jesus the ultimate prophet.

But Jesus went above and beyond the role of the normal prophet. God made many promises through the prophets down through the centuries. As prophet, Jesus Himself made many promises. Jesus went beyond the role of prophet because He did not just speak the promises of God, but He also keeps the promises that God spoken through the mouths of the prophets.

Jesus is the King anointed by God. As God, Jesus also reigns over all things. That makes Him the King of Kings and Lord of Lords. It’s by the reign of His power that all things exist and have their being. It’s by the reign of His grace that He brings forgiveness to His church on earth. It is by the reign of His glory that He leads His church into eternity. Even here Jesus serves well beyond any earthly king. As King, Jesus not only establishes the law of His kingdom, but He humbled Himself in obedience to that law and obeyed it in our place.

Jesus is the priest anointed by God. The priest represents the people before God. Who better to represent humanity before God than the One who is both true God and true man? Truth is Jesus is the only one truly qualified to be our priest. All the other priests in the Old Testament were merely shadows pointing forward to the true high priest, Jesus the Anointed One.

And as you probably know Jesus went way beyond the role of any priest from the line of Aaron. The priests of the Old Testament offered up sacrifices before God. Jesus offered up Himself as the “once for all” sacrifice that truly and literally did take away the sin of the world.

It’s only on the cross that we see what it means to be the Messiah, and there we see what He was anointed for. On the cross Jesus, freely and willing offered His blood as payment for the sin of the world. And on Easter He was raised showing that offering was accepted and the debt of sin was paid in full and that humanity was justified. That is the confession, the rock upon which Christ church is built.

Jesus though tempted as we are lived and died without sin, that is He overcome sin. Since death is a consequence of sin, Christ defeated death at the same time and so resurrection must follow for the victory to be complete. That’s what God revealed to Peter, that sin and death would be swallowed up in victory. And so, it is with His resurrection that Jesus taught His last lesson on what it means to be the Christ.

It’s also with that complete picture in mind that we begin to understand Peter’s confession, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” I mean Peter didn’t dream up this confession, Jesus specifically said that the Father in heaven gave this confession to him and that it would be the very foundation of His church and that the gates of hell will not prevail against it.” This confession is as Jesus implies solid as a rock, telling us clearly who Jesus is and what Jesus did.

We who by grace have received this gift of faith in Jesus as the Christ have a relationship with God that will last forever. Jesus promised that He would always be with us. He has promised that you and I and all who believe will live with Him forever when the day comes for us to leave this world. And if you let Him, the Holy Spirit, working through Word and Sacrament will convince you of the truth found alone in God’s Prophet, Priest and King, and our Savior, Jesus the Christ.

In His Name, Amen

The Boat We Call Church

August 13, 2017
By Pastor David French

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The Boat We Call Church
Matthew 14:22-33

Today’s Gospel lesson tells us that Jesus went up on the mountain by Himself to pray. Biblical scholars tell us that Jesus often prayed during times of severe temptation. Remember that Jesus in His state of humiliation or during His earthly ministry didn’t use His divine power to help Himself. That means contrary to popular opinion it wasn’t any easier for Jesus to resist temptation because He is God then it is for those who are in Christ.

As we read in Hebrews 4:15 We do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. So, Scriptures teach that every temptation Jesus endured caused Him the same anguish … the same tension … the same struggle that temptation produces in us. One difference of course is that Jesus resisted all those temptations and we don’t.

So, what’s the temptation that Jesus was dealing with in today’s Gospel reading? Today’s reading follows last week’s reading of the Feeding of the 5,000. Jesus had just finished converting a couple of fish and five loaves into a banquet for 5,000 men and their families. This feeding was so significant that all four Gospels record it for us. It’s St. John who records the crowds’ reaction to the free food. [6:15] Perceiving then that they were about to come and take him by force to make him king, Jesus withdrew again to the mountain by himself. There satan again tempts Jesus to avoid the cross for an earthly kingdom.

When we understand this temptation, we understand the reason that Jesus made the disciples get into the boat and go before Him to the other side. Jesus has taught us to pray, Lead us not into temptation, in today’s reading Jesus is answering that prayer for the disciples. He was delivering them from temptation by commanding them to get into the boat and head for the other side of the Sea of Galilee.

Jesus then sent the crowds away and went into the nearby mountains to spent the night alone in prayer. By the time Jesus finished Matthew tells us that Jesus had spent the entire night praying. When Jesus got up and looked out across the Sea of Galilee, He could see that the disciples were still out on the water because they also had been up all night fighting head winds and were still a long way from the land ….

So, they’d been up for about twenty-four hours and were in the process of making their second trip across the Sea of Galilee, this time during a storm. I don’t know about you, but my mind starts to get a little foggy after being awake well before twenty-four hours. And then, just to top off the day, they find themselves in the middle of the lake fighting the wind and waves. They had to have been totally exhausted.

Now, while Jesus never used His divine power to help Himself, He did on occasion use it to help others, and at that moment His disciples needed His help. So, Jesus walked down from the mountain across the beach, and just kept walking right out on the water until He reached His disciples who were in a boat in a storm in the middle of the Sea of Galilee.

And what was the first reaction of the disciples when they saw that help was on the way? Were they relieved? Did they rejoice when they saw Jesus? Well … not so much! When the disciples saw Jesus they were terrified, and said, “It is a ghost!” and they cried out in fear. They were terrified. Why! Truth is because they didn’t know it was Jesus.

It seems to me that before we know who He is, everyone responds to Jesus that way. St. Paul writes to the church in Rome. Romans 8:7 The mind that is set on the flesh is hostile to God, for it does not submit to God’s law; indeed, it cannot. The prophet Isaiah described his encounter with the Lord this way. Isaiah 6:5 “Woe is me! For I am lost; for I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips; for my eyes have seen the King, the Lord of hosts!” You see because we are conceived in sin and so sinners by nature and so the presence of our Holy God is a terrifying thing.

But then Jesus identifies Himself. “Take heart; it is I. Do not be afraid.” That is because they were terrified, Jesus encouraged them to, “Take heart.” Because they didn’t know who He was, Jesus said, “It is I.” Because they were afraid, He speaks to their fear saying, “Do not be afraid.”

You see for those who don’t know Him seeing Jesus coming to you was and will be a terrifying thing. So Jesus went to them, right where they were, and with His reassuring Words He gives them all they need.

That should have been enough but obviously for Peter it wasn’t and replies: Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” It would seem that Peter wanted more proof than the simple Word of God. Peter wanted a personal sign.

Now it’s not uncommon in Scriptures that when God’s people ask for something we’ll say “odd” God gives it to them to give them as a reality check if you will. Jesus said, “Come.” And Peter got out of the boat and walked to Jesus on the water. But instead of just standing next to Jesus, Peter began to look around. The wind and waves, the danger was real and it was very close. Peter begin to sink, his terror returns and he cries out, “Lord, save me.”

Now this was a lesson Peter would never forget and from which we also can learn. As Christians, we talk a lot about faith, but it’s important to remember there is more than one way to understand faith and so our talk about must accurately reflect what Scriptures teach. It is not enough to have a sincere and heart felt faith if it’s in the wrong thing. You can have a faith that fills the world, but if that faith has the wrong object then it is not saving faith.

The world says, “Believe in yourself.” Really! Look at your life in the light of the Ten Commandments. Do you really want to put your faith in you for salvation? Peter had faith in his faith but when tested he didn’t believe that Jesus was able to protect him from the storm. Thankfully for Peter, and for us, Jesus is patient, gracious, and merciful and He took hold of Peter and brought him back to the boat and the wind ceased.

Now while not a parable still we can use todays lesson to remind ourselves for example how Christ’s mercy and grace fills our lives. We can see why since the days of Noah the boat has been a symbol of Christ’s church. We can see His disciples at times not being satisfied with the Words alone that Jesus gives to us in His boat or church.

We know how inside our own hearts, like Peter, we want a personnel experience with Jesus. And so like Peter we often put our faith in our thoughts instead of God’s promises. And yet no matter how often we find ourselves sinking in a situation that we ourselves have created, Jesus is always ready to rescue us and bring us back to the place where He restores us with His gifts that is His church.

To be sure, Jesus did a lot more than walk on water to save His people. The payment itself of course was offered on the cross where Jesus became the greatest sinner of all time by taking the sin of the world upon Himself, and offering the blessings of that cross to us in His Word and Sacraments. As Paul writes: For our sake God made His Son who knew no sin to be sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.

You see when Jesus died, yours sins died with Him. When Jesus rose you and all who are connected to Him by the waters of our baptism rose with Him and are even now freely justified by grace through faith in Him alone. Fear not because you do know Christ and are in Christ and in Him you and all who believe have been saved.

In His Name, Amen.

 

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