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Prophet, Priest, and King

August 27, 2017
By Pastor David French

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Prophet, Priest, and King
Matthew 16:13-20

Last week’s Gospel had the disciples in the area around Tyre and Sidon located on the shore of the Mediterranean in Gentile territory. Jesus had taken the disciples North of Galilee around Caesarea Philippi to get away from the badgering of the scribes and Pharisees in Jerusalem.

Jesus used this time away from the crowds of Galilee to teach His disciples. Today’s lesson really continues the theme of the last two weeks which has been about the true identity of Jesus. Jesus began the conversation by asking the disciples about the opinion of the crowds. [Jesus] asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, others say Elijah, and others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.”

It is sort of interesting that all of their guesses are dead prophets. Herod had recently killed John the Baptist. Elijah was taken up in a whirl-wind about a thousand years earlier. Jeremiah had disappeared somewhere in Egypt after the Babylonians destroyed Jerusalem over a half century earlier. The people in our lesson thought that Jesus was one of these dead prophets come back to life.

I wonder what people would say if you took a poll at a busy shopping center and asked who is Jesus? I would guess that some would say a rebel, others a great teacher or maybe a life coach. Still others think of Jesus as some permissive personality who pretty much lets you do whatever you want as long as you don’t hurt anyone else.

There were many opinions back then and there are many opinions today. The problem with opinions is that opinions based on guesswork are usually wrong. Opinions about who Jesus is are no exception. People who simply guess about Jesus’ identity based on what they may or may not know will get it wrong.

The truth however is when you get the identity of Jesus wrong, you get salvation wrong. You can talk like a Christian all day long and maybe even fool a lot of people into believing you’re a Christian, but, in the end, you will enter into eternal punishment. As the last two weeks have pointed out, to understand salvation you must know who Jesus is.

And there is only one right answer to that question and we heard that answer from Peter of all people. [Jesus] said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” Simon Peter replied, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father who is in heaven. This is the only right answer both then and now.

But what does it mean that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of the living God? Jesus knew that the disciples wouldn’t understand the answer to that question until after He had suffered, died, and rose from the dead. That’s why Jesus strictly charged the disciples to tell no one who He was. He knew the disciples didn’t understand and He didn’t want them to give others the same wrong understanding of what it means to be the Christ.

The title Christ comes from the Greek word that means to anoint. The Hebrew equivalent is Messiah. So we can say the Christ, or the Messiah or we can say the Anointed One. They all mean the same thing and refer to the same person.

Now anointing you may recall was a rite for setting someone aside for a special office. In the Old Testament, Aaron was anointed priest, David was anointed king, and Elijah anointed Elisha to be the prophet after him. The anointed offices of the Old Testament are prophet, priest, and king. As the Anointed One, Jesus fulfilled all of those offices just like Moses said.

Jesus is the prophet anointed by God. Now it’s easy to see Jesus as prophet when we understand what a prophet is and who Jesus is. A prophet is someone who speaks for God. Jesus is both man and God. Who better to speak for God than God Himself which makes Jesus the ultimate prophet.

But Jesus went above and beyond the role of the normal prophet. God made many promises through the prophets down through the centuries. As prophet, Jesus Himself made many promises. Jesus went beyond the role of prophet because He did not just speak the promises of God, but He also keeps the promises that God spoken through the mouths of the prophets.

Jesus is the King anointed by God. As God, Jesus also reigns over all things. That makes Him the King of Kings and Lord of Lords. It’s by the reign of His power that all things exist and have their being. It’s by the reign of His grace that He brings forgiveness to His church on earth. It is by the reign of His glory that He leads His church into eternity. Even here Jesus serves well beyond any earthly king. As King, Jesus not only establishes the law of His kingdom, but He humbled Himself in obedience to that law and obeyed it in our place.

Jesus is the priest anointed by God. The priest represents the people before God. Who better to represent humanity before God than the One who is both true God and true man? Truth is Jesus is the only one truly qualified to be our priest. All the other priests in the Old Testament were merely shadows pointing forward to the true high priest, Jesus the Anointed One.

And as you probably know Jesus went way beyond the role of any priest from the line of Aaron. The priests of the Old Testament offered up sacrifices before God. Jesus offered up Himself as the “once for all” sacrifice that truly and literally did take away the sin of the world.

It’s only on the cross that we see what it means to be the Messiah, and there we see what He was anointed for. On the cross Jesus, freely and willing offered His blood as payment for the sin of the world. And on Easter He was raised showing that offering was accepted and the debt of sin was paid in full and that humanity was justified. That is the confession, the rock upon which Christ church is built.

Jesus though tempted as we are lived and died without sin, that is He overcome sin. Since death is a consequence of sin, Christ defeated death at the same time and so resurrection must follow for the victory to be complete. That’s what God revealed to Peter, that sin and death would be swallowed up in victory. And so, it is with His resurrection that Jesus taught His last lesson on what it means to be the Christ.

It’s also with that complete picture in mind that we begin to understand Peter’s confession, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” I mean Peter didn’t dream up this confession, Jesus specifically said that the Father in heaven gave this confession to him and that it would be the very foundation of His church and that the gates of hell will not prevail against it.” This confession is as Jesus implies solid as a rock, telling us clearly who Jesus is and what Jesus did.

We who by grace have received this gift of faith in Jesus as the Christ have a relationship with God that will last forever. Jesus promised that He would always be with us. He has promised that you and I and all who believe will live with Him forever when the day comes for us to leave this world. And if you let Him, the Holy Spirit, working through Word and Sacrament will convince you of the truth found alone in God’s Prophet, Priest and King, and our Savior, Jesus the Christ.

In His Name, Amen

Scraps

August 20, 2017
By Pastor Peter Heckert

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Scraps
Matthew 15:21-28

+ Grace to you, and peace, from God our heavenly Father, and from our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. + Amen.

The text for our meditation is from our Gospel lesson, especially where Matthew records the Canaanite’s woman’s response, "Yes, Lord, yet even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters' table," as well as Jesus’ response to her, "O woman, great is your faith! Be it done for you as you desire." Here ends our text; dear Christian friends…

This lesson…is a lot like life. What I mean is that, in life, there are a lot of questions, a lot of issues that we want, even feel that we need, answers to, but that we will not get answers to. Why is it that this disease has hit my loved one? Why did that tornado hit my home, and not my neighbor’s instead? Why can’t I be better at volleyball, even though I try my hardest? Why can’t we seem to have kids? Why can’t I seem to kick this sinful habit, this addiction? Why can’t I be a different person? Why are people so ugly to each other? What will it take to reunite the people of our country? When will the wars, the violence, finally come to an end? Lots of questions … not a whole lot of answers.

So it is with our text; there are plenty of questions that likely rise to the forefronts of our minds, but are wanting for any answers. Why is Jesus acting like this? To say that He is acting out of character is an understatement; He sounds downright cold! He doesn’t even acknowledge the presence of this pleading Canaanite mother, let alone give her what she desires: relief for her demon-afflicted daughter. His silence is deafening! That’s not Jesus, we think to ourselves; why on earth is He behaving thusly? You can guess, by all means, but you won’t find the answer.

What was the tone of voice of the disciples in this interaction? Were they dismissive of this pagan nobody? Were they just wanting Jesus to give her what she wanted so she would leave them alone to do more important things? No answers. And Jesus simply responds, "No, I was just sent for the lost sheep of Israel," and does nothing. Why? No answers.

How about the woman herself? It’s safe to assume that she’s a bit of a wreck at this point; anyone who has experienced the mere presence of the demonic, let alone hostile activity and oppression, know how terrible an ordeal it is, but she keeps pursuing, keeps trying to talk to Jesus. How does she react to His apparent apathy? What about His remark about not giving the children’s bread to feed the dogs? Obviously, it’s not a very flattering statement, but does she feel insulted? Hurt? No answers. There is, however, one question that I do believe our text does seem to spell out for us quite clearly, and it’s this: what does great faith believe about Jesus?

If you’ve looked through the Gospel accounts with a close eye, you’ve likely noticed that Jesus doesn’t often hand out compliments to those around them regarding their faith; let’s face it – He’s just not that impressed. With this Canaanite woman, however, Jesus exclaims, O woman, your faith is great! That may sound odd to us as Lutherans, knowing that faith is a gift from God, not something that can really be quantified in any way that we know of, but still. We have the Second Person of the Trinity here, Jesus Himself, saying of a Canaanite woman, "great is your faith." So, again, it begs the question: what does great faith believe?

We’re blessed to be given the answers in our text, and there are two. The first is this: great faith knows and believes who Jesus really is. This woman is a Canaanite – nothing about her should have, according to contemporary standards, been held up as a paradigm of faith and trust in the one true God! She’s a Gentile, she’s a woman (remembering that, at that time, a woman’s testimony wasn’t permissible in court), and she’s a Canaanite! Three strikes, you’re out, according to 1st Century Judean sensibilities. Nevertheless, here she is, addressing Jesus the way a disciple would by calling Him "Lord." In Matthew’s Gospel, calling Jesus "Lord" was something only His disciples would do, and yet, here she is, the only exception to that rule as she calls out after Him, Have mercy on me, O Lord.

She also addresses Jesus like a true Israelite would, calling Him the "Son of David," using a very loaded term describing David’s heir, the King who would come to rule in righteousness and to save His people. Is she just parroting what she’s heard other people say, or does she know exactly what she’s saying in addressing Jesus in this way? … She knows. Her words are intentional. She knows to Whom she is calling after, and this becomes clear after Jesus tells her, in essence, that

it is not right to give Israel’s gifts to the Gentiles. He is, after all, the Son of David, and He comes from a specific people and a specific God – YHWH, the only true God. He has come to fulfill specific purposes and promises related to a specific plan which YHWH had set in motion. Jesus is a specific Messiah; you can’t just decide to have the Jesus that you want. He is the Lord over all, and if Jesus is Lord, that means that she … is not. If Jesus is Lord, that means much more than she or anyone else around Him could have possibly known until after He had taken up His throne in the cross, died at the hands of evil men, and been vindicated as He showed Himself to be Lord even over death in His resurrection. Lord over death, and thus, Lord over everything.

Does she know what she’s saying when she calls Him "Lord?" Yes, absolutely she does, and one little word proves it definitively. I am unsure why, but it seems as though many English translations of the Bible actually mistranslate a word in the Canaanite woman’s response. Our ESV records her response, Yes, Lord, yet even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters' table. The word they translate as "yet" is the Greek conjunction gar. It means "for," it means "because." She’s not arguing with Jesus, or otherwise appealing to Him to make an exception to the rule in her case. That’s what the mistranslation seems to indicate. There’s no "yet." There’s no "but," or "however." She’s not arguing with Him; she’s agreeing with Him! She’s agreeing with Him, and she explains why it is that she agrees with Him.

She knows that Jesus is Israel’s Messiah, that He has a specific plan to carry out and promises to fulfill, and she believes Him to be the Lord. She knows that God is keeping His promises to Israel, and that Jesus’ authority is all that matters. Yes, Lord, she says, because even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters' table. Did you hear the difference? She’s saying, You’re right, Lord; it’s not right to take the children’s bread and give it to the dogs. Yes, Lord, it’s not right because the dogs … get to eat, too, from the crumbs and scraps that fall from the master’s table. The dogs don’t need the children’s bread because they’re already taken care of. That’s all I need, Lord – so rich and filling and gracious is the table of Israel’s Messiah and King, that the crumbs are all that I need … and I know that there is something here … for me. That’s the second thing that great faith believes: she knows who Jesus really is … and she knows that He’s got something for her, too. Jesus responds, O woman, your faith is great, and He gives.

Dear Christian friends, here are truths that we, too, believe. Jesus is the Messiah, David’s royal – and greater – Son. He is the King who was hailed … and then rejected, tortured, crucified … died, with all the world’s sin and brokenness, on a Friday. The world was dark. But overcoming every plot and dark dream the world and the forces of evil could concoct, God raised Him from the dead, and He lives eternally, exalted, at the right hand of the Father. And He is the Lord. And He has something for you.

This doesn’t make great faith easy; indeed, often it makes things considerably more difficult. If Jesus is Lord, then I am not, much as I may want to be sometimes. If Jesus is Lord, and He has something for me, it’s possible that what He’s got for me is something that I might not have wanted. Nevertheless, the Son of David is risen from the dead, thus He is the Lord, and He is for you. You have a place with Him? Yes. You belong to His people? Yes. He forgives you of your sin? Yes. He gives you peace, a purpose for your living, and the promise that, one Day, there will be full healing of all, and eternal life of body and soul with Him? … Yes.

Great faith knows who Jesus is, and believes that He has something for you, scraps and all.

+ In the Name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. + Amen.

The Boat We Call Church

August 13, 2017
By Pastor David French

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The Boat We Call Church
Matthew 14:22-33

Today’s Gospel lesson tells us that Jesus went up on the mountain by Himself to pray. Biblical scholars tell us that Jesus often prayed during times of severe temptation. Remember that Jesus in His state of humiliation or during His earthly ministry didn’t use His divine power to help Himself. That means contrary to popular opinion it wasn’t any easier for Jesus to resist temptation because He is God then it is for those who are in Christ.

As we read in Hebrews 4:15 We do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. So, Scriptures teach that every temptation Jesus endured caused Him the same anguish … the same tension … the same struggle that temptation produces in us. One difference of course is that Jesus resisted all those temptations and we don’t.

So, what’s the temptation that Jesus was dealing with in today’s Gospel reading? Today’s reading follows last week’s reading of the Feeding of the 5,000. Jesus had just finished converting a couple of fish and five loaves into a banquet for 5,000 men and their families. This feeding was so significant that all four Gospels record it for us. It’s St. John who records the crowds’ reaction to the free food. [6:15] Perceiving then that they were about to come and take him by force to make him king, Jesus withdrew again to the mountain by himself. There satan again tempts Jesus to avoid the cross for an earthly kingdom.

When we understand this temptation, we understand the reason that Jesus made the disciples get into the boat and go before Him to the other side. Jesus has taught us to pray, Lead us not into temptation, in today’s reading Jesus is answering that prayer for the disciples. He was delivering them from temptation by commanding them to get into the boat and head for the other side of the Sea of Galilee.

Jesus then sent the crowds away and went into the nearby mountains to spent the night alone in prayer. By the time Jesus finished Matthew tells us that Jesus had spent the entire night praying. When Jesus got up and looked out across the Sea of Galilee, He could see that the disciples were still out on the water because they also had been up all night fighting head winds and were still a long way from the land ….

So, they’d been up for about twenty-four hours and were in the process of making their second trip across the Sea of Galilee, this time during a storm. I don’t know about you, but my mind starts to get a little foggy after being awake well before twenty-four hours. And then, just to top off the day, they find themselves in the middle of the lake fighting the wind and waves. They had to have been totally exhausted.

Now, while Jesus never used His divine power to help Himself, He did on occasion use it to help others, and at that moment His disciples needed His help. So, Jesus walked down from the mountain across the beach, and just kept walking right out on the water until He reached His disciples who were in a boat in a storm in the middle of the Sea of Galilee.

And what was the first reaction of the disciples when they saw that help was on the way? Were they relieved? Did they rejoice when they saw Jesus? Well … not so much! When the disciples saw Jesus they were terrified, and said, “It is a ghost!” and they cried out in fear. They were terrified. Why! Truth is because they didn’t know it was Jesus.

It seems to me that before we know who He is, everyone responds to Jesus that way. St. Paul writes to the church in Rome. Romans 8:7 The mind that is set on the flesh is hostile to God, for it does not submit to God’s law; indeed, it cannot. The prophet Isaiah described his encounter with the Lord this way. Isaiah 6:5 “Woe is me! For I am lost; for I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips; for my eyes have seen the King, the Lord of hosts!” You see because we are conceived in sin and so sinners by nature and so the presence of our Holy God is a terrifying thing.

But then Jesus identifies Himself. “Take heart; it is I. Do not be afraid.” That is because they were terrified, Jesus encouraged them to, “Take heart.” Because they didn’t know who He was, Jesus said, “It is I.” Because they were afraid, He speaks to their fear saying, “Do not be afraid.”

You see for those who don’t know Him seeing Jesus coming to you was and will be a terrifying thing. So Jesus went to them, right where they were, and with His reassuring Words He gives them all they need.

That should have been enough but obviously for Peter it wasn’t and replies: Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” It would seem that Peter wanted more proof than the simple Word of God. Peter wanted a personal sign.

Now it’s not uncommon in Scriptures that when God’s people ask for something we’ll say “odd” God gives it to them to give them as a reality check if you will. Jesus said, “Come.” And Peter got out of the boat and walked to Jesus on the water. But instead of just standing next to Jesus, Peter began to look around. The wind and waves, the danger was real and it was very close. Peter begin to sink, his terror returns and he cries out, “Lord, save me.”

Now this was a lesson Peter would never forget and from which we also can learn. As Christians, we talk a lot about faith, but it’s important to remember there is more than one way to understand faith and so our talk about must accurately reflect what Scriptures teach. It is not enough to have a sincere and heart felt faith if it’s in the wrong thing. You can have a faith that fills the world, but if that faith has the wrong object then it is not saving faith.

The world says, “Believe in yourself.” Really! Look at your life in the light of the Ten Commandments. Do you really want to put your faith in you for salvation? Peter had faith in his faith but when tested he didn’t believe that Jesus was able to protect him from the storm. Thankfully for Peter, and for us, Jesus is patient, gracious, and merciful and He took hold of Peter and brought him back to the boat and the wind ceased.

Now while not a parable still we can use todays lesson to remind ourselves for example how Christ’s mercy and grace fills our lives. We can see why since the days of Noah the boat has been a symbol of Christ’s church. We can see His disciples at times not being satisfied with the Words alone that Jesus gives to us in His boat or church.

We know how inside our own hearts, like Peter, we want a personnel experience with Jesus. And so like Peter we often put our faith in our thoughts instead of God’s promises. And yet no matter how often we find ourselves sinking in a situation that we ourselves have created, Jesus is always ready to rescue us and bring us back to the place where He restores us with His gifts that is His church.

To be sure, Jesus did a lot more than walk on water to save His people. The payment itself of course was offered on the cross where Jesus became the greatest sinner of all time by taking the sin of the world upon Himself, and offering the blessings of that cross to us in His Word and Sacraments. As Paul writes: For our sake God made His Son who knew no sin to be sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.

You see when Jesus died, yours sins died with Him. When Jesus rose you and all who are connected to Him by the waters of our baptism rose with Him and are even now freely justified by grace through faith in Him alone. Fear not because you do know Christ and are in Christ and in Him you and all who believe have been saved.

In His Name, Amen.

 

Good Eats

August 06, 2017
By Pastor Peter Heckert

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Good Eats
Isaiah 55:1-5

+ Grace to you, and peace, from God our heavenly Father, and from our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. + Amen

The text for our meditation is from our Old Testament lesson, from the Prophet Isaiah, especially where he writes, “Come, everyone who thirsts, come to the waters; and he who has no money, come, buy and eat! Come, buy wine and milk without money and without price. … Incline your ear, and come to me; hear, that your soul may live; and I will make with you an everlasting covenant, my steadfast, sure love for David.” Here ends our text; dear Christian friends…

If you are looking for some source material for your own personal or family devotions, I’d like to suggest to you that the prophetic words of Isaiah are excellent for such purposes. If you’ve never read the whole thing straight through, it’s a fascinating book – originally a scroll. It’s written about the falls of both the northern kingdom of Israel, and of the southern kingdom of Judah, and the Prophet even writes of the release of Judah from the Babylonian exile – and all of this is written proleptically, written about future events as if they’ve already happened, written about a century before Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon was even born. It’s a beautiful blend of story and prophecy, of Law and Gospel, of debauchery and exile, as well as forgiveness and redemption There is a reason why some theologians have dubbed Isaiah’s writings as the “Fifth Gospel Account.”

Now, we don’t chop up the book of Isaiah, as the more skeptical theologians do by separating the book into four or more parts, written by four or more authors. No, we hold that Isaiah was written by the historical prophet of YHWH named Y’shaehyahu, a later contemporary of the prophet Amos, but we will say that he wrote in two different styles. About the first 2/3 of the book are words of condemnation, words of warning against both kingdoms of Israel, but there is a significant shift at the beginning of chapter 40, starting with the words, Comfort, comfort my people, says your God. Speak tenderly to Jerusalem, and cry to her that her warfare is ended, that her iniquity is pardoned, that she has received from the Lord's hand double for all her sins. If you will, the first portion is written for stiff-necked, arrogant, sinful pre-exilic Israel, and the latter portion is written for the broken Judahites who have languished in a foreign land, surrounded by a pagan people, threatened with mistreatment and even death on a daily basis. These broken people are the ones who are going to be redeemed by YHWH their God, and it is in this section of Isaiah that our reading falls.

More specifically, it’s thought that the 55th chapter is written to the Judahites after Babylon has fallen to Cyrus the Great of Persia. He has conquered the conqueror, acting as YHWH’s mighty and just hand against the wicked nation He had used to punish His people. Cyrus had conquered, and now the Judahites were free. They were free from the oppressive Babylonian captivity, and they were free to return to their own land. Indeed, according to the post-exilic prophet Ezra, Cyrus issued a decree which said, YHWH, the God of heaven, has given me all the kingdoms of the earth, and he has charged me to build him a house at Jerusalem, which is in Judah. Whoever is among you of all his people, may his God be with him, and let him go up to Jerusalem, which is in Judah, and rebuild the house of the Lord, the God of Israel. The people of Judah were being encouraged to return to their homeland, to pick up the pieces and rebuild their shattered civilization, but for whatever reason – whether it was lethargy, or what Red from The Shawshank Redemption calls “being institutionalized” – they did not want to leave.

I think it was a lack of belief on the part of the people. They were YHWH’s chosen people … and they had been hauled off into captivity, to a pagan nation with customs and traditions very foreign, and oppression quite severe. Now, along comes a new conqueror – and you know the saying courtesy of The Who, “Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.” But he’s not like the old boss. Cyrus says to return, to go back to Judah. It all sounds too good to be true, and as my Grandpa Heckert was wont to say, “If it seems too good to be true, that’s because it usually is.” The people needed some words of encouragement, words of comfort, words of reassurance that their time of chastisement was now over

So like a street vendor in a bazaar or a boothman at the state fair, YHWH invites His people, Come! Come, everyone who thirsts, come to the waters. Come, you who have no money, come, buy and eat! The time of punishment, of castigation, was over – and it wasn’t because of anything that they had done that it was over. It was purely by YHWH’s grace, His mercy, His steadfast lovingkindness, that the time was over, and Judah was welcome to come, once again, to the founts of His love, to return to the land flowing with milk and honey, to return to the comforting embrace of His mighty arms. His invitation echoes what the Psalmist wrote long before: Oh, taste and see that the Lord is good!

This is the same message that Jesus gave to those 5000+ people. They had nothing to bring to the table, no riches with which to buy food that temporarily nourished the body. They were entirely reliant on their Teacher, their Lord … and boy, did He ever deliver. As He did centuries prior for the Hebrews wandering in the wilderness, as He has done throughout history by sending rain on the just and the unjust, Jesus provides His people with food for the physical body. Likewise, He gives them spiritual nourishment, as He did through Isaiah when He said, Incline your ear, and come to me; hear, that your soul may live; and I will make with you an everlasting covenant, my steadfast, sure love for David

See, this is what YHWH does. He provides for His people, according to their various needs, and while we are neither Judahites in Babylon lacking the motivation to return to Jerusalem, nor 5000+ men, women, and children in the Judean countryside with aching bellies, we ourselves still are entirely dependent upon our Lord. The United States of America in 2017 is not the physical Babylon, but you can certainly hear echoes of that pagan nation here in our own land, and you can certainly see images of a similar oppression of the people of God. You can hear similar groanings from those who, for whatever reason, don’t wish to return to Jerusalem the Golden, to the true Temple that was torn down and rebuilt three days later. The plight of God’s people is the same throughout the ages, as we wander, pilgrims in a strange land, looking for the promised deliverance to come from God’s own hand. But He is faithful, and if He has promised it, you can be sure that He will, in His own time, bring it to fruition!

So YHWH’s invitation is the same now, here in this place, as it was back in the iterations that came before. Come, My people! He says. Come for the good eats that I provide! Come, you who thirst for forgiveness, and I will give you the cool waters of absolution! Come, you who long for spiritual milk and nourishment, and I will strengthen you with My Word. Come, you who hunger for righteousness, and My Son will give to you Himself, His own holy, precious, body and blood in, under, and with bread and wine, given and shed for you! Don’t worry about payment; your green money cannot pay the infinitely high toll, but My Son has paid it! Simply come and partake of what He has purchased, what I now give to you! Come, incline your ear to Me; listen to My words of Law and Gospel, that you may repent and believe that My Son died for the forgiveness of all your sins and secured for you salvation and life eternal! I have made, in Him, an everlasting covenant that no one will be able to break! Come, partake of these good eats, now, where you are, and enjoy them in eternity at My Son’s marriage feast, which will have no end! Come, taste and see, that I, YHWH, the Lord your God, am good!

 

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