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Archives - September 2017

Scorching Heat?

September 24, 2017
By Pastor David French

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Scorching Heat?
Matthew 20:1-16

There’ve been many changes in our society over the years. One thing that has not changed, however, is "waiting in line" or "taking your turn." It is amazing how complicated the rules for waiting in line are. Yet everyone seems to know them. You can't cut in line, but you can save a place for someone in line under the right circumstances. It is amazing that people will quietly wait in line, but if someone breaks the protocol, cries of "Hey! Wait your turn!" erupt from those who have put in their time.

It’s this deep mindset in our culture that makes the words of Jesus in today's Gospel so bizarre. He told a story and then said: So the last will be first, and the first last …, which goes against pretty much everything that our society thinks of as fair.

Today's Gospel relates the story that Jesus told we know as the "Laborers in the Vineyard." The main point of this story is fairly straight forward. The work day represents a life time. We see that some people are born into faithful families who bring them to the Lord while they are still infants.

These people never know a time when Jesus is not a part of their lives. At the other end of the spectrum are people who make death bed confessions - people like the thief on the cross. The Holy Spirit brings these people into the faith just days or even moments before death.

As the master hires people at various times of the day, we are meant to think of the different points in life when the Holy Spirit brings people to faith. The point is - as long as it is day – that is, as long as a person is alive – it’s not too late for the Holy Spirit to bring him or her into God's family.

We also need to remember that first and last are not always related to time or standing in line. In the Scriptures the words: "First and Last" can also have a broader meaning. The verses right before today's Gospel reading are about the rich, young ruler who came to Jesus and wanted to know what he must do to be saved. Jesus first points to the second table of the commandments those forbidding murder, adultery, theft, and so forth. The young man claimed to have kept them all.

Then Jesus went back to the first table of the law and we discover that this young man loved his possessions more than he loved God. The next words Jesus speaks are about the camel and the eye of the needle ending with the words: Again I tell you, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich person to enter the kingdom of God.". And His disciples respond: … Who then can be saved?

You see at that time people thought they were first in God’s sight because of their wealth alone and other people were last or least in God’s sight because of their poverty alone. And we’re no different.

Our culture has many ways of judging people to be a part of the upper crust: wealth, fame, talent, beauty, and while none of these things are bad they certainly aren’t an indication of how much God loves us either. Jesus wants us to remember that many who we judge to be the “least” in our culture may in fact be the first to enter the kingdom of heaven.

And then there’s the, maybe too familiar, attitude of those hired first. Listen to their concern again. 'These last worked only one hour, and you have made them equal to us who have borne the burden of the day and the scorching heat.'

Now before we consider their complaint, let’s think in general about the experience of life time Christians. They are baptized into God's family as infants. They were brought to church on a weekly basis to receive the forgiveness that Jesus Christ earned on the cross for all. As they grew up, they were taught the basics of the faith. After they demonstrated the ability to examine themselves, they received the gift of Christ's body and blood on a regular basis.

When they encountered difficult times, God's reminds them that He is always with them. The Holy Spirit worked throughout their lives to keep them in the faith so that when their last hour came, they left this valley of the shadow of death and joined our Lord in heaven.

The life time Christian knows that Jesus is always with them. They simply can't see Him while they live in this sin-filled world. Since Jesus is here, the reign of heaven has already begun.

The life time Christian knows that he or she is not trying to earn a place in heaven but simply waiting for the day when God will reveal what we already processes. The life time Christian has from the moment of their baptism possessed forgiveness and life and all the other blessings that come from the cross until we are home with Christ in heaven.

Given all these blessings, why do you think the life-long Christian in our text describe his life as a burden or as scorching heat? Stings a little bit doesn’t it? You see it’s so easy, so natural for us to feel as though we’re doing some great thing for God when by His gracious invitation we become a Christian. It’s so who we are to think that heaven is some sort of reward for those who bear a cross for Jesus.

The person who makes the death bed confession receives the same heaven that a life time Christian receives. On the other hand, this person who received the last-minute reprieve did not experience a life time of forgiveness from Jesus while on earth. They didn’t know the peace that comes from God alone. They never knew what it’s like to always have someone who listens.

Every now and then someone will ask the obvious question. "If God will give me all of heaven whether I become a Christian today or twenty years from now, why not wait? Why not have a little fun, enjoy life and then become a Christian?

And that can work if you see tomorrow but still that’s a person who at that moment has been convinced by satan the world and their own flesh that the life of the Christian is a burden. I mean so many rules: honor your parents, don’t kill or steal from each other not to mention the expectation that you go to church. Who would have time to enjoy life if all you’re doing is being “good” for God.

They of course don’t understand that Jesus carried the burden of being good for God to the cross for each of us a long time ago. They don’t understand the Christian life is a gift from the Holy Spirit. They don’t understand what they’re missing and only the Holy Spirit can explain or open their eyes and minds to … not just know about Jesus but to live their life in Him. They don’t understand … but they can!

this very day God continues to search the market place that is the world looking for workers for His vineyard. Truth is it really doesn’t matter when we receive faith only that we do. You see whether our faith is old or young, we rejoice because no matter when … we all received faith as a gift, a gift that brings with it, life everlasting through the blood Christ shed for you and for all.

In His Name, Amen

 

Absurd

September 17, 2017
By Pastor Peter Heckert

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Absurd
Matthew 18:21-35

+ Grace to you, and peace, from God our heavenly Father, and from our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. + Amen.

The text for our meditation is from our Gospel lesson, especially where Peter asks the question, Lord, how often will my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? As many as seven times? and Jesus’ response, I do not say to you seven times, but seventy-seven times. Here ends our text; dear Christian friends…

The story goes of a young man who worked at a nursing facility, and how he provided care for an older woman. In the course of his work, he had done something he should not have done – I’ll refrain from saying what it was, but suffice it to say, he had transgressed against this elderly lady. While certainly a sinner in this regard, this young man did have a conscience, and soon it burdened him enough to the point that he had to confess. He went to the lady, told her flat-out what he had done. “I’m sorry,” he said. “I was stupid and foolish, and while I know I don’t deserve it, I hope you will forgive me and give me a chance to make it up to you.” The woman stared at him, a mild frown on her face as she studied his. “Hmm…” she said at length. “I forgive you, young man … but NOT a second time.”

Maybe we all know why this older woman said this. After all, we’ve all been on the receiving end of someone promising to amend their ways, promising to do better, only to face disappointment as they fail yet again. The frustration, the anger that such broken promises bring to bear is enough to drive us mad! “You said you were going to change! Why haven’t you?! I thought we were past this!”

We’ve all been in those shoes. We’ve been there, whether it’s a child promising never to do “it” again (whatever “it” happens to be), a student who promises to never again not do their homework, or the parent who says they’ll never cave to their addiction again. Broken hearts from broken promises, and at a certain point, we may certainly ask with Peter, Lord, how often will my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? As many as seven times? It’s reasonable, we think. Fool me seven times, shame on you; fool me eight or more times, shame on me. We can’t be expected to forgive again … and again … and again … right? At a certain point, the one who asks for forgiveness must not be forgiven if they keep on making the same mistakes again and again … right? Forgiveness, at that point, seems absurd, right?

WRONG. And not just wrong – it’s DEAD-wrong. “Not seven times,” Jesus corrects, “but seventy-seven … or seventy-times-seven … times.” Regardless of what the Greek actually meant, it’s a symbolic numbering meant to show Peter and us the absolute absurdity of keeping number of the times we are sinned against. Jesus is saying, “STOP COUNTING! Knock it off! Stop keeping track of the offenses and simply forget; don’t do the math!” I don’t’ think that He could be any clearer here, and I don’t think the emphasis is wrong. It is simply absurd to think that we should do otherwise! And Jesus’ parable which follows shows us why.

We’re told about a king who is attempting to settle accounts with his servants. In the process, he comes across one servant whose account is short by ten thousand talents – to put it in modern fiscal terms, that would be as if your average Joe owed the government between $7 - and $12 billion. It’s an absurdly high debt which the servant could not settle, not with an entire lifetime of surrendering 100% of his pay. Even more absurd is the servant’s promise that, given time, he would make good on this insane debt. Instead of calling shenanigans on the servant, the king takes pity on him, and forgives that massive debt. All of it. Not a shekel does that servant owe any longer. He’s free.

And what does this, undoubtedly, relieved and unburdened servant do? He goes out. He zeros-in on a fellow servant who owes him a pittance by comparison: a hundred denarii, or close to $6,000 – a sizeable debt, to be sure, but by comparison, to the billions of dollars the first servant owed, it’s a drop in the bucket. That first servant finds this fellow servant who owes him a few grand, and almost verbatim, the second pleads for mercy from the first. He promises to pay back the debt (a more realistic feat, honestly) if he is just given more time. But the second servant finds no mercy here. Instead, he finds himself thrown into the debtor’s prison until the total amount would be paid off.

You can imagine the fury of the king when news of this happening gets back to his ears. He summons the first servant, castigates him for his lack of mercy, and orders him, not just to be thrown into debtor’s prison, but to torture, until he pays back that entire $12 billion debt. It’s a parable that should make us a bit uneasy, especially when Jesus caps it off by saying, So also my heavenly Father will do to every one of you, if you do not forgive your brother from your heart.

Jesus’ point here? Our personal experience of God’s forgiveness should shape our attitude of forgiveness toward others. Because, let’s face it, we’ve all been in the shoes of the person who’s fallen for the same old trap, the same old temptation yet again. Whether it’s something as mild as being a clumsy oaf yet again, or that you’ve fallen off the wagon yet again, the disappointment, the heartbreak, the frustration with one’s self, the desire for forgiveness and the chance to try again, is something we are all familiar with. We’re familiar with it because we come to that same place at the end of every day, as we look back and reflect how we have sinned against God and neighbor in thought, word, and deed, by what we have done, and by what we have left undone. I have no doubt that, some days, you find yourself thinking, “Wow, did I really do that again?” So knowing this, how often we all consistently fall for the same temptations and vices, the question becomes, “Do you really want God doing the math for your sins??”

No, of course not. To imagine God as vindictive, to imagine Him holding grudges the way that we sometimes do, is terrifying. But the plain and simple fact is that He does not do this to those seeking His pardon, mercy, and grace. When one repents of one’s sin – it doesn’t matter if it’s the first time or the fiftieth time that one has fallen into that trap or caved to that temptation – for the sake of Christ, our heavenly Father announces His great Te absolvo – “You are absolved. Pardoned. Forgiven.” And the more we hear how we are forgiven in spite of our insurmountable debt, the more that forgiveness rubs off on us. He who is forgiven much, forgives much. That’s part of the reason why we have confession and absolution week in and week out – to proclaim that “Because of Jesus’ sacrifice of His own life on the cross on our behalf, your sins are FORGIVEN” and because you are forgiven, you should be as quick to forgive others as our heavenly Father is quick to forgive us. Will you do it perfectly? No, but that’s the beauty of living in repentance – we’re always confessing before God our sins and recognizing His life-giving absolution for the sake of Christ and His all-atoning sacrifice. That is why we partake of the Lord’s Supper, receiving Jesus’ very body and blood in those supper elements, receiving – not only the forgiveness of sins incarnate in that bread and wine, but also knowing the promise of the Holy Spirit to soften hearts to no longer bear a grudge, but rather to harbor forgiveness toward our fellow servants.

Let’s go back to our story from the beginning. The relationship between the older lady and the young man working at the nursing home was healing. However, one day, wouldn’t you know it, that idiot of a young man did it again; he transgressed against the lady once more. What’s worse, this time, he remembered her words from before: not a second time. Understandably, he was terrified of the repercussions of what awaited him as he approached her room to confess. Was he going to lose his job? Get arrested? What was she going to inevitably demand happen to this multi-transgressor? He entered her room, bearing the full weight of his guilt, not even able to look her in the eye. “Ma’am,” he said, “I’ve got to tell you, again, I have transgressed against you. Even though you warned me that you would not forgive me a second time, I did it again. I know how this looks, and I know I have absolutely no business asking it, but I must, once again, ask for your forgiveness.” He finally looked up and saw, instead of anger, a look of confusion, puzzlement, on her face. “What do you mean, ‘once again’? I forgave you for what you did before – that’s wiped away, gone forever. We’re starting over again! Of course I forgive you – but I won’t … a second time. That would be absurd!”

+ In the Name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit + Amen

 

What About Your Guardian Angel?

September 10, 2017
By Pastor David French

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What About Your Guardian Angel?
Matthew 18:1-10

Depending on who you ask or what TV shows you watch there are many different ways to tell if a person is lying. One of the most commonly held beliefs is that a person won’t or can’t look you in the eye when they’re lying to you. They’ll look up, down, off to the side, but they won’t look you in the eye. But the truth is there are those who can and do look us straight in the eye and lie to us.

In our Gospel lesson for this morning, we get a glimpse of this heavenly eye-to-eye reality with God’s holy angels; the same angels who God Himself sends to watch over and protect us in our day-to-day lives. As Jesus said: For I tell you, that in heaven the angels of these little ones always see the face of My Father who is in heaven. Now, it’s important to notice and keep in mind that Jesus is speaking to His disciples. He’s not speaking to the Pharisees or some crowd of unbelievers but He is as it were, speaking to His Church.

The disciples of Jesus, as well-intentioned and faithful as they were, had some serious flaws. I mean here they are, this time and the Greek makes clear were arguing about who among them would be the greatest in heaven. But in their defense, you can sort of understand, I mean the last two years have been nothing but Jesus putting the Pharisees and Sadducees in their place, doing miracle after miracle, healing the sick, raising the dead, feeding the poor, huge crowds gathered wherever Jesus went. And remember the last words of John’s gospel: Jesus did many other things as well. If every one of them were written down, I suppose that even the whole world would not have room for the books that would be written.

You see up until really the time of Peter’s confession about ten days ago when Jesus started talking about His death they had been on one amazing journey. But they were also starting to get a little bit full of themselves if you will. Envisioning Jesus kingdom the way they did and all they began elbowing and posturing to be the “greatest”.

Jesus was well aware that His ministry was about to take a change His disciples just don’t anticipate which is why Jesus sets, a baby in their midst, and says: Unless you repent and become like these little ones in your faith, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. Whoever humbles himself like this little child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven.”

Now, some people hear this and start talking about the innocence of a child being what Jesus is urging us to strive for here. But that’s wrong, plain and simple. Babies are by nature completely self-centered. They don’t care that mom hasn’t slept 2 hours in a row in days.

They don’t care that dad has to get up early in the morning. For the infant, it’s all about me! This doesn’t even consider the fact that babies get sick and sometimes sadly they die. Truly, the wages of sin is death.

My friends if babies were innocent there would be no miscarriages or stillbirths, no tiny coffins. Do you really think babies don’t need of a Savior? I mean, didn’t Christ die so that all who have faith in Him will not perish but have everlasting life? Isn’t the gift of faith created in all who are baptized?

So, are babies innocent … no. But do Christian babies have a more trusting faith than any thinking reasoning person? Absolutely! This is the reality that Jesus is speaking to with His proud and arrogant disciples. The littlest of children have nothing to bring to the table in terms of salvation. They don’t have any works or words or deeds to put their trust in.

We on the other hand actually feel good about ourselves when in our inner thoughts we consider: … all the good things we’ve done. The baby has nothing but the faith God created within them and that faith holds to nothing but the gospel promise of forgiveness worked in their hearts.

One problem we have is we forget faith is not an act of the mind but a living and active gift of God. As Paul writes to the Thessalonians your faith is growing more and more (2 Thess 1:3) Another problem we have is the influence of the world also grows more and more.

That’s the point Jesus is making when He speaks to His disciples about how the guardian angels of these children see the face of my Father who is in heaven. These children are indeed sinful, no different than any of us, but they are living their faith in a God pleasing way and we adults are not. The guardian angels of the little-ones have nothing to be ashamed of before God. They don’t have to avert their eyes when they come to God about the one under their care.

So, what about your guardian angel? Jesus is implying that the guardian angels of those “great” disciples do not see God’s face. That is, they avert their eyes in shame when they’re in the presence of the heavenly Father. I can only imagine how my guardian angel must feel every time he goes before God. “Lord, it’s it seems as though Your Will is being done in-spite of him rather than through him.” And if you don’t confess this same thing about your life, then you’re in the same boat as the disciples in our lesson who were blinded by their own perceived glory.

Seriously, if you can’t look at your life in the light of the Ten commandments and see that you and every Christian who thinks for him or herself makes our guardian angels ashamed to stand before God and report on how we’ve handled this gift we call life then you’re not being honest with yourself or with God who already knows and wants only to forgive you. You can’t seriously believe that your Lord is proud of every thought word or deed that has come from or is hidden within you?

But before you hang your heads in despair, lamenting the fact that by these standards no one can be saved, remember that Jesus Christ live in your place and gave up His life to pay for your sin. Repent and believe that you may by grace live your faith confidently looking forward to the time you look your Lord in the eye confessing to Him that you are sinful and unclean and deserve nothing but His present and eternal punishment.

You know you’re not really just a victim of circumstance. It’s not your parents, spouse, children or works fault and the devil didn’t make you do it. Be honest. You have sinned because you are a sinner, sinful from birth and by nature an enemy of God.

The solution, the only solution is to repent. Open the eyes of faith God gave you and behold the glory of His unconditional and amazing grace. Hear and taste the real and tangible forgiveness and love He feeds you this very day in the form of His Word and His very body and blood. He is the One who takes away the sin of the world! Because Christ died for all. This is the gospel truth we live with, rejoice and be glad for Christ has washed you clean with His blood and made you His own.

In Jesus's name, Amen

For My Sake

September 03, 2017
By Pastor Peter Heckert

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For My Sake
Matthew 16:21-28

+ Grace to you, and peace, from God our heavenly Father, and from our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. + Amen.

The text for our meditation is from our Gospel message, specifically where Jesus tells His disciples, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow Me. For whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for My sake will find it.” Here ends our text; dear Christian friends…

Ours is a faith rife with paradoxes, isn’t it? Many things which are set forth in Scripture seem contrary to what one would reasonably conclude. For example, we are, at the same time, sinners, lowest of the low … and saints, justified fully by God! How both can be true at the same time is beyond our comprehension. Israel stood condemned because of their success, their affluence … and it was their captivity, their languishing under foreign oppression, that turned out to be the best thing for them! The worst persecutor of the Church, Saul of Tarsus, the man who stood by as Stephen was stoned to death and gave his approval … ended up becoming the greatest missionary to the Gentiles, even dying for his faith in Christ!

It’s the last thing you would expect! Certainly, it’s not what we, in our humanity, would guess as to the ways of redemption and salvation. At times, our faith is downright unreasonable. We see these paradoxes, these issues that grind against the grain of our humanity and mortality, and the rest of humanity usually concludes, “Well, the Bible must be wrong. What it’s saying goes against our sensibilities, our reason; ergo, it must be wrong…” As Christians, we would do well to remember that it is not our reason that rings true in those situations. The Scripture is what is true, regardless of what our reason wants to believe. After all, human reason is … well, human. A wonderful gift from God, meant to be used in service of the Scriptures, our reason is flawed, tainted by sin, so that we can’t expect it to lead us to godly, biblical conclusions.

So in our text, when we hear the interesting and not easily explained paradox of saving the soul to lose it and losing the soul to save it, we’re tempted, thanks to our broken reason, to explain it away. That’s not what we’re going to do today, lest we wander into heresy. Instead, let’s get at this critical teaching of Jesus by pitting one side of the paradox against the other.

Let’s tackle that first side, when Jesus says, whoever would save his life will lose it. To “save one’s life,” or “to save one’s soul,” as some translations say, means that the person decides he or she has to do something, whatever it might be—to work hard enough, do the right things, not do the bad things, toe the line—so that he or she will end up in heaven. We call this pietism. We call this self-righteousness. Please note the word self, there. It means that, by some sort of criteria, one has to do or perform or complete some actions by which God will accept that person into the glories of heaven when this life is over.

If that sounds like nails on a chalkboard to you, that’s good. We, as Lutherans, should recognize – and recoil from – such false teaching! In fact, whenever we hear that phrase “self-righteousness,” the red flags should be flying up in your minds. We see it all over the place – from well-intentioned Christians who think to themselves, “I don’t drink, smoke, listen to heavy metal – I’m golden!” That’s on an individual level; you see it institutionally in the form of what’s called, “decision theology,” where you must make the decision to “ask Jesus into your heart” in order to be considered saved. You have to make the conscious effort, using your own willpower and emotions, to pray and invite Jesus into your heart so that you will be accepted by God and have eternal life. That may sound reasonable enough, but the focus, the responsibility, falls on the individual to be saved.

It’s this theology, this false teaching, that Jesus is speaking against. The harder we try, the further away we get. Luther’s Small Catechism echoes this; in his explanation of the Third Article of the Creed, we read, I cannot by my own reason or strength believe in Jesus Christ, my Lord, or come to Him; but the Holy Spirit has called me by the Gospel, enlightened me with His gifts, sanctified and kept me in the true faith. Without the intervention of the Holy Spirit, we’d be just like those misguided Christian brothers and sisters who are missing out on the fullness of Gospel.

But that’s not a problem that we, as Lutherans, have, right? That’s just a problem that all those other denominations out there have, right? Wrong. As sinners, every one of us has the exact same inclinations, temptations, to try to save ourselves. This clinging to self-salvation, self-righteousness, self-justification, is what it means, in Jesus’ words in our text, to desire to save one’s life, or soul. We can’t, just can’t, save ourselves. Were it not for the Holy Spirit, we would all be like all the other world religions – all of which believe that to save oneself, one must do something. We would be the same way, because it’s the way every human being by nature is hardwired to think. Our sinful nature knows only this as the way of salvation, to do whatever it takes to save ourselves. It’s in our DNA, if you will, to try and be self-savers. That’s what we would be, and we would be lost. We would be damned. In the same way that a dead man cannot charge up an AED and start his own heart again, we cannot save ourselves from being spiritually blind, dead, and enemies of God.

‚ÄčSo that doesn’t work. Now let’s take a look at the flipside of our paradox. What does it mean when Jesus says, whoever loses his life for My sake will find it? What does it mean to lose one's life, one's soul as some translations put it, for Jesus’ sake? The answer is not found in martyrdom, literally losing your life for the sake of the Gospel. That is its own thing; certainly, it’s something to be honored, but unrelated to what Jesus is talking about here. The answer for how it looks to lose one’s soul for Jesus sake is found a few verses earlier when Jesus says, If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow Me.

Denying, disowning oneself. That means, with the help of the Holy Spirit, confessing that we cannot save ourselves. That means admitting that we are entirely reliant upon God Almighty, the very fearful Judge of our souls, for our salvation. One does the ad in denying one's ability to save on self. Recognizing that we are entirely holistically sinful, that we cannot redeem ourselves from our sinful conditions and relying entirely thanks to the gift of the Holy Spirit upon Christ. It's an air of repentance it's an attitude of repentance. It is humbling. It is intimate. It is scandalous to our reason, but it is the truth. This is why the Gospel is called a “stumbling block.” We want to do it, and we cannot. We simply let Jesus do it for us. The one who loses his soul is the one who denies himself and his own ability to save himself and rests solely upon the cross of Christ. He is the one who finds his soul, his life., or perhaps, rather, he is the one who is found.

But note the reason why one would “lose one’s soul.” Christ says, “Whoever loses his soul for My sake will find it.” Salvation can only be for the sake of Christ. Self-denial is great, but unless one trusts in what Jesus has done for the forgiveness of sins and salvation, unless one follows Him in that way, it’s all for naught. Only Christ lived the perfect life and died the sinless death. Only Christ stood in our place as the worst of sinners, even though He was holy and blameless. Only Christ made the complete and full payment for all our sins when He died on the cross so that all sin would be removed. Yes, Jesus did all that. Yes, He died and rose and gave you eternal life, just as the Spirit has brought you to believe. It all hinges on Christ.

Having come to know all this by faith, through that blessed gift of the Holy Spirit, we rejoice and rejoice greatly that salvation is indeed for the sake of Christ. Since we are incapable of doing anything for ourselves, this is an out-of-this-world gifting. An unreasonable gift, given for free, for Jesus’s sake.

+ In His Name. + Amen.

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